Climate Home News
At the Clean Energy Frontier
Women walking inside the solar park to fetch water

Indonesia turns traditional Indigenous land into nickel industrial zone

Women walking inside the solar park to fetch water

India wants its own solar industry but has to break reliance on China first

Lithium boom: Zimbabwe looks to China to secure a place in the EV battery supply chain

More stories are coming soon. Stay tuned!

3
Women walking inside the solar park to fetch water

Indonesia turns traditional Indigenous land into nickel industrial zone

Women walking inside the solar park to fetch water

India wants its own solar industry but has to break reliance on China first

Lithium boom: Zimbabwe looks to China to secure a place in the EV battery supply chain

At the
clean
energy
frontier

A wave of green industrialisation is needed if we are to manufacture the clean energy technologies at the scale and speed we need to wean the global economy off fossil fuels and keep the planet habitable.

From lithium mining in Zimbabwe that could supply China’s EV industry and India’s efforts to emerge as a global hub for solar manufacturing, to plans to turn Indigenous land in Indonesia into a nickel industrial park, this brings opportunities as well as challenges. At Climate Home, we believe it also calls for better scrutiny of this growing sector.

This is why, through a series of deeply reported articles, Climate Home News will explore the major trends, players, and innovations shaping the supply chain of clean energy technologies.

It starts with the dirty business of mining the critical minerals necessary to produce solar panels, wind turbines, and batteries. In some parts of the world, such as Indonesia’s nickel heartland in Sulawesi, this has led to competition — and at times conflict — over land.

In a world of heightened geopolitical tensions, the concentration of the extraction and processing of many critical minerals in a few countries has exacerbated competition and fostered new alliances as nations seek to secure access to resources.

This story cannot be told without highlighting the role of China, which towers over the manufacturing of solar panels, rechargeable batteries, and electric cars.

Some mineral-rich nations such as Zimbabwe and Indonesia have attracted billions of dollars in Chinese investments to extract, refine, and process transition minerals. Others in the west and India are seeking to compete with China’s dominance by diversifying their supply chains and gearing up their own manufacturing capacity.

Finally, across the world, scientists, engineers, and researchers are looking for solutions to make manufacturing clean energy technologies cheaper, more efficient, and with fewer impacts on the world’s most vulnerable peoples and ecosystems.

This series will tell the stories shaping the global clean energy supply chain. It will spotlight emerging trends, hold major players to account, and explore how these new industries can help the world build climate-proof economies and leave fossil fuels behind.

At the
clean
energy
frontier

A wave of green industrialisation is needed if we are to manufacture the clean energy technologies at the scale and speed we need to wean the global economy off fossil fuels and keep the planet habitable.

From lithium mining in Zimbabwe that could supply China’s EV industry and India’s efforts to emerge as a global hub for solar manufacturing, to plans to turn Indigenous land in Indonesia into a nickel industrial park, this brings opportunities as well as challenges. At Climate Home, we believe it also calls for better scrutiny of this growing sector.

This is why, through a series of deeply reported articles, Climate Home News will explore the major trends, players, and innovations shaping the supply chain of clean energy technologies.

It starts with the dirty business of mining the critical minerals necessary to produce solar panels, wind turbines, and batteries. In some parts of the world, such as Indonesia’s nickel heartland in Sulawesi, this has led to competition — and at times conflict — over land.

In a world of heightened geopolitical tensions, the concentration of the extraction and processing of many critical minerals in a few countries has exacerbated competition and fostered new alliances as nations seek to secure access to resources.

This story cannot be told without highlighting the role of China, which towers over the manufacturing of solar panels, rechargeable batteries, and electric cars.

Some mineral-rich nations such as Zimbabwe and Indonesia have attracted billions of dollars in Chinese investments to extract, refine, and process transition minerals. Others in the west and India are seeking to compete with China’s dominance by diversifying their supply chains and gearing up their own manufacturing capacity.

Finally, across the world, scientists, engineers, and researchers are looking for solutions to make manufacturing clean energy technologies cheaper, more efficient, and with fewer impacts on the world’s most vulnerable peoples and ecosystems.

This series will tell the stories shaping the global clean energy supply chain. It will spotlight emerging trends, hold major players to account, and explore how these new industries can help the world build climate-proof economies and leave fossil fuels behind.

Stay tuned
for more
climate news

What is this project about?

The Clean Energy Frontier is a series of six deeply reported stories from reporters around the world shining a light on the supply chains which produce clean energy technologies, such as batteries for electric vehicles, solar panels, and wind turbines.

What to expect?

By blending on-the-ground storytelling with investigative techniques, our stories will explore where and how clean energy technologies are made, some of the trade-offs they create, and how they can become the backbone of greener economies.

When will the stories be published?

The first three stories will be published weekly from 23 January. The next round of three stories will be published in the spring.

Can I still pitch a story idea for the series?

It’s not too late to pitch us your brilliant ideas but you should be quick. We are currently in the process of commissioning the next three stories. Have a look at our pitching guidelines and send us your pitch by the start of February.

How do I get in touch with you about the project?

We welcome ideas, suggestions, and comments about the series. If you would like to get in touch, please email project editor Chloé Farand at chloe.farand@outlook.com. We would love to hear your feedback!